MAN SE 

New leading position for MAN in Denmark

Highest truck market share in the company’s history

MAN recorded its highest ever market share in the Danish truck market in fiscal year 2011 at 23.3 percent. This enabled MAN to confirm its top position in Denmark, where it was already at a leading level the previous year with 20.8 percent. Denmark is a key production and development site for MAN. MAN is the global leader in the market for two-stroke large-bore diesel engines. The know-how for this primarily originated from the development center in Copenhagen. Total revenue in Denmark amounted to around €134 million in 2011.

With more than 2,000 employees and almost 80 vocational trainees, MAN is a large employer in Denmark. In addition to the workforce at MAN Truck & Bus, a large majority of the employees are based at MAN Diesel & Turbo’s three sites in Copenhagen, Frederikshavn, and Holeby. “Our Danish employees are an important part of the MAN family. Their dedication and their high level of expertise form the very foundation of our leading technology and market success,” explains Jörg Schwitalla, Chief Human Resources Officer of MAN SE.

MAN Truck & Bus has had a strong, constant market share of around 20 percent in the truck market for years. MAN primarily has a leading position among hauliers operating in international trade. According to Christian Barsøe, Head of MAN Truck & Bus in Denmark: “Our strong market position shows that customers trust MAN. These enduring relationships with customers are important to us.” MAN Truck & Bus’s main office is in Greve/Copenhagen and it has another five branches throughout the country’s regions. Two private dealers and ten service partners also ensure that MAN is present in the sales and servicing business.

Around half of the world’s entire trade is moved by MAN; the lion’s share is transported by ship. When it comes to two-stroke engines that drive large container ships, freights, and tankers, MAN’s market share is particularly high. To make these engines more efficient and low-emission still, engineers at the R&D center in Copenhagen intensively research innovative technologies. In 2011, MAN Diesel & Turbo chalked up another significant achievement in the large-bore diesel engine segment in relation to the Tier III emission limits set by the International Maritime Organization (IMO). An MAN licensee built the world’s first two-stroke engine that already meets the emission standard applicable from 2016. The engine features second-generation EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) technology and is being tested as a prototype on a Maersk Line freight ship. “Our engineers have achieved a great deal by quickly developing this engine. The fact that we already meet the 2016 standard shows just how innovative MAN is,” says Thomas Knudsen, Head of the Low Speed business unit at MAN Diesel & Turbo.

Both of MAN’s business areas have a long tradition in Denmark. MAN Truck & Bus was represented as far back as the 1930s by an importer that was then taken over in 1979. Our marine diesel engine business has ties with Denmark that go back even further. More than a century ago, it cooperated on diesel engines with shipbuilder Burmeister & Wain. Together with MAN, Rudolf Diesel spent the period from 1892 to 1897 designing an engine at the Augsburg site, which was later named after him, and readying it for production. One of the first licenses back then went to Denmark. Burmeister & Wain then went on to deliver the first diesel-powered ocean-going ship, the MS Selandia, in 1912 – a milestone for the international shipping industry. Following many years of cooperation with Burmeister & Wain, MAN eventually took over the shipmaker’s engine business in 1981.